The Tubbataha Protected Area Management Board

The Tubbataha Protected Area Management Board (TPAMB) is the policy-making body for the Tubbataha Reefs. It was created in 1999 and has 20 members from the national and local government, the academe and the private sector, all of which are considered stakeholders in the future of Tubbataha:

  • Department of Environment and Natural Resources
  • Palawan Council for Sustainable Development
  • Representative 1st District of Palawan
  • Representative 2nd District of Palawan
  • Office of the Governor, Palawan
  • Municipality of Cagayancillo
  • Sangguniang Bayan of Cagayancillo-Committee on Environment and Natural Resources
  • Sangguniang Panlalawigan-Committee on Environment & Natural Resources
  • Sangguniang Panlalawigan-Committee on Appropriations
  • Western Command
  • Philippine Navy
  • Philippine Coast Guard
  • Philippine Commission on Sports and Scuba Diving
  • Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources
  • Palawan State University
  • Western Philippine University
  • WWF-Philippines
  • Conservation International-Philippines
  • SAGUDA-Palawan
  • Tambuli ta mga Kagayanen, Inc.

The Tubbataha Management Office

The Tubbataha Management Office (TMO), which is based in Puerto Princesa City, serves as the TPAMB's executive arm, carrying out day-to-day park administration.

Protected Area Superintendent Angelique M. Songco
Admin and Finance Officer Mary Grace D. Barber
IEC Officer Glenda G. Simon
Admin Assistant Mary Jane P. Aaron
IEC Assistant Emmalyn N. Tura
Research Assistant/IEC Staff Ma. Retchie C. Pagliawan
Research Assistant/IEC Staff Rowell C. Alarcon
Paralegal Officer Arlene B. Libres
Marine Park Ranger/Researcher Segundo F. Conales Jr.
Marine Park Ranger Roy P. Magbanua
Marine Park Ranger Noel A. Bundal
Marine Park Ranger/Researcher Jeffrey David

 

Marine Park Rangers

The ranger station perched on the southernmost tip of Tubbataha’s North Atoll is home to a combined team of 10-12 men from the Philippine Navy, Philippine Coast Guard, Municipality of Cagayancillo and the TMO. Stationed for two months at a time, 130 kilometres from the nearest inhabited islands, their job is to protect the park from illegal activities including fishing and collection of other marine life such as top shells (Trochus niloticus).

Their work includes:

  • Regular patrols around the park
  • Conducting scientific research and monitoring
  • Briefing visitors during the dive season
  • Surface and underwater cleanups
  • Reporting and responding to unusual incidents, like crown-of-thorns starfish infestations.
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